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What Powers Are Given to the Senate?

[Summary]What are the special powers of the Senate? | Reference.com Full Answer Treaties can only be passed by the Senate with a two-thirds vote in favor. Impeachment also requires a two-thirds vote in favor. Approval of presidentially-appointed officials, ho

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What are the special powers of the Senate? | Reference.com

Full Answer

Treaties can only be passed by the Senate with a two-thirds vote in favor. Impeachment also requires a two-thirds vote in favor. Approval of presidentially-appointed officials, however, requires only a majority vote. The special powers of the Senate are different than the expressed and implied powers. The expressed powers are those specifically assigned to Congress, comprised of the Senate and House of Representatives, by the United States Constitution that pertain to its legislative role within the government. The implied powers of Congress give the Senate and the House of Representatives the ability to pass laws that they believe are necessary for the good of the country. The special powers are those that are meant to be part of the three-branch checks and balances system, which prevents any one branch of the government from having too much power. In particular, these special powers help Congress ensure that the executive branch of the government does not exercise too much control over the government. The House of Representatives has some special powers that are unique to it as well. Although Congress is similar to Parliament, Congress has much more power than members of a traditional parliamentary government.

Senate votes down proposal to expand FBI surveillance powers

What Powers Are Given to the Senate?

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday voted down a Republican-backed proposal to expand the Federal Bureau of Investigation's secretive surveillance powers after the mass shooting at an Orlando gay nightclub last week.

The Powers of Congress [ushistory.org]

6a. The Powers of Congress

At its creation in 1789, the legislative branch was the most innovative.

Rule by kings and emperors was an old style of government, and the legislature in many ways represented the new. Almost certainly, the founders intended Congress to have more important powers than the President and the Supreme Court. However, they placed many checks and balances on the legislature that have prevented absolute power in the hands of one branch. Founders controlled power not only by checks from the other branches, but by creating a bicameral, or two house, Congress — the Senate and the House of Representatives. The powers of Congress, then, are both constitutional and evolutionary.

Separation of powers

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The Legislative Branch

The United States Congress is made up of the House of Representatives and the Senate. Learn more about the powers of the Legislative Branch of the federal government of the United States.

Powers of the President of the United States

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The President of the United States has numerous powers, including those explicitly granted by Article II of the United States Constitution.

The Constitution explicitly assigned the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of his or her Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors. The president may make treaties which need to be ratified by two-thirds of the Senate. The president may also appoint Article III judges and some officers with the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate. In the condition of a Senate recess, the president may make a temporary appointment.

The House and the Senate: Differences in Responsibilities and Representation

Congress is split into two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate. Congress writes national legislation by dividing work into separate committees which specialize in different areas. Some members of Congress are elected by their peers to be officers of these committees. Ancillary organizations such as the Government Accountability Office and the Library of Congress provide Congress with information, and members of Congress have staff and offices to assist them. Additionally, a vast industry of lobbyists helps members write legislation on behalf of diverse corporate and labor interests.

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