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The President Can Veto Laws Passed in Congress

[Summary]Veto A veto – Latin for "I forbid" – is the power (used by an officer of the state, for example) to unilaterally stop an official action, especially the enactment of legislation. A veto can be absolute, as for instance in the United Nations Secu

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Veto

A veto – Latin for "I forbid" – is the power (used by an officer of the state, for example) to unilaterally stop an official action, especially the enactment of legislation. A veto can be absolute, as for instance in the United Nations Security Council, whose permanent members (China, France, Russia, United Kingdom, United States of America) can block any resolution. Or it can be limited, as in the legislative process of the United States, where a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate may override a Presidential veto of legislation.[1] A veto gives power only to stop changes, not to adopt them (except for the rare "amendatory veto"). Thus a veto allows its holder to protect the status quo.

Presidential Vetoes | US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives

1President George H. W. Bush withheld his signature from two measures during intrasession recess periods (H.J. Res. 390, 101st Congress, 1st sess. and S. 1176, 102nd Congress, 1st sess.). See, “Permission to Insert in the Record Correspondence of the Speaker and the Minority Leader to the President Regarding Veto of House Joint Resolution 390, Authorizing Hand Enrollment of H.R. 1278, Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989, Along With Response From the Attorney General (House of Representatives - January 23, 1990),” Congressional Record, 101st Cong., 2nd sess., (January 23, 1990): H3. See, “Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental and Native American Public Policy Act of 1992 (House of Representatives - March 03, 1992),” Congressional Record, 102nd Cong., 2nd sess., (March 3, 1992): H885-H889. The President withheld his signature from another measure during an intrasession recess period (H.R. 2699, 102nd Congress, 1st sess.) and from a measure during an intersession recess period (H.R. 2712, 101st Congress, 1st sess.) but returned both measures to the House, which proceeded to reconsider them. The measures are not included as pocket vetoes in this table.

President of the United States

Incumbent
Barack Obama

since January 20, 2009 (2009-01-20) Executive Branch of the U.S. Government
Executive Office of the President Style Mr. President
(informal)[1][2]
The Honorable
(formal)[3]
His Excellency[4][5][6]
(in international correspondence) Member of Cabinet
Domestic Policy Council
National Economic Council
National Security Council Residence White House Seat Washington, D.C. Appointer Electoral College Term length Four years
renewable once Constituting instrument United States Constitution Inaugural holder George Washington
April 30, 1789 Formation March 4, 1789
(227 years ago) (1789-03-04) Salary $400,000 annually Website Official website

The President of the United States (POTUS)[7][note 1] is the elected head of state and head of government of the United States. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

List of United States presidential vetoes

The phrase presidential veto does not appear in the United States Constitution, but Article I requires every bill, order, resolution or other act of legislation by the Congress of the United States to be presented to the President of the United States for his approval. When the President is presented the bill, he can either sign it into law, return the bill to the originating house of Congress with his objections to the bill (a veto), or neither sign nor return it to Congress after having been presented the bill for ten days exempting Sundays (if Congress is still in session, the bill becomes a law; otherwise, the bill does not become a law and is considered a pocket veto). The list below contains many of the bills vetoed and pocket vetoed by Presidents.

Constitution of the United States - We the People

The President Can Veto Laws Passed in Congress

A highly accessible, easy to use online version of the U. S. Constitution with the full text including the Bill of Rights and the rest of the Amendments includes both sequential and subject indexes.

Kids in the House

Creating laws is the U.S. House of Representatives’ most important job. All laws in the United States begin as bills. Before a bill can become a law, it must be approved by the U.S. House of Representatives, the U.S. Senate, and the President. Let’s follow a bill’s journey to become law.

The Bill Begins

Bank Veto (July 10, 1832)—Miller Center

The bill "to modify and continue" the act entitled "An act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States" was presented to me on the 4th July instant. Having considered it with that solemn regard to the principles of the Constitution which the day was calculated to inspire, and come to the conclusion that it ought not to become a law, I herewith return it to the Senate, in which it originated, with my objections.

[Editor: Admin]
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