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Nosocomial Infections

[Summary]Nosocomial Infections and Hospital-Acquired Illness Nosocomial Infections & Hospital-Acquired Illnesses - Overview Health care facilities - whether hospitals, nursing homes, or outpatient facilities - can be dangerous places for the acquisition of in

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Nosocomial Infections and Hospital-Acquired Illness

Nosocomial Infections & Hospital-Acquired Illnesses - Overview

Health care facilities - whether hospitals, nursing homes, or outpatient facilities - can be dangerous places for the acquisition of infections. The most common type of nosocomial infections are surgical wound infections, respiratory infections, genitourinary infections, as well as gastrointestinal infections.

Hospital-acquired infection

(Learn how and when to remove this template message) Nosocomial infection Nosocomial Infections
Contaminated surfaces increase cross-transmission Classification and external resources Specialty Infectious disease ICD-10 Y95 eMedicine article/967022 [edit on Wikidata]

A hospital-acquired infection (HAI), also known as a nosocomial infection, is an infection that is acquired in a hospital or other health care facility. To emphasize both hospital and nonhospital settings, it is sometimes instead called a health care‚Äďassociated infection (HAI or HCAI). Such an infection can be acquired in the hospital, nursing home, rehabilitation facility, outpatient clinic, or other clinical settings. Infection is spread to the susceptible patient in the clinical setting by various means. Health care staff can spread infection, in addition to contaminated equipment, bed linens, or air droplets. The infection can originate from the outside environment, another infected patient, staff that may be infected, or in some cases, the source of the infection cannot be determined. In some cases the microorganism originates from the patient's own skin microbiota, becoming opportunistic after surgery or other procedures that compromise the protective skin barrier. Though the patient may have contracted the infection from their own skin, the infection is still considered nosocomial since it develops in the health care setting.

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1 in 25 Patients End Up with Hospital-Acquired Infections

Nosocomial Infections

Some hospitals have more risks than others, and according to the CDC report, hospital-acquired infections now affect one in 25 patients.

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