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Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior

[Summary]Basic Facts About Mexican Gray Wolves The Mexican gray wolf is a subspecies of the gray wolf. Commonly referred to as "El lobo," this wolf is gray with light brown fur on its back. Its long legs and sleek body enable it to run fast. Though they

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Basic Facts About Mexican Gray Wolves

Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior

The Mexican gray wolf is a subspecies of the gray wolf. Commonly referred to as "El lobo," this wolf is gray with light brown fur on its back. Its long legs and sleek body enable it to run fast. Though they once numbered in the thousands, these wolves were wiped out in the U.S. by the mid-1970s, with just a handful existing in zoos. In 1998, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, led by Jamie Rappaport Clark (now president of Defenders of Wildlife), released 11 Mexican gray wolves back into the wild in Arizona.

mexicanwolves.org

The Lobo Life

The Mexican gray wolf, or "lobo," roamed throughout southeastern Arizona, southern New Mexico, and western Texas through the early 1900s, and south into northern Mexico until the 1980s. Today, around 60 wild wolves roam the headwaters of the Gila River in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico.

The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program Home

2016 Denning Packs and wolf pups

This summer, members of the IFT have documented denning behavior in at least 11 Mexican wolf packs in the Mexican Wolf Recovery Area. As of mid-July, a minimum of 42 pups in 9 packs (Bluestem, Elk Horn, Hoodoo, Iron Creek, Luna, Panther Creek, Prieto, SBP, and Tsay O Ah) have been documented. Six of the 42 pups in the count are a result of cross foster events. Throughout the summer and into the fall, the IFT will continue to monitor and document wolf pup numbers. As the pups get older, the IFT will attempt to capture pups, administer vaccines, and affix pup size radio collars to monitor survival.

Mexican Gray Wolf

Mexican Gray Wolf

Canis lupus baileyi

Wolves are wild carnivore members of the dog family (Canidae). They are believed to be ancestors of the domestic dog, which evolved separately more than 20,000 years ago. Only two species of wolves remain today -- the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) -- also called the Timber Wolf -- and the Red Wolf (Canis rufus).

Mexican Gray Wolf: Habitat

A biologist, above, looks at a cow elk killed by wolves. People hunt the same game that wolves prey upon.
Photo Courtesy of George Andrejko, Arizona Game and Fish Department

While wolves can impact prey populations, it’s usually because there are other factors involved that also stress the prey - deep snow, drought, or disease. Wolf-predator studies show that most wolves rarely eliminate their prey, but may influence the size of prey populations. For instance, a prey population that was increasing without wolves would still increase with the presence of wolves, but more slowly. Also, if the prey population was already declining, the presence of wolves could accelerate the decline.

Gray wolf

Middle Pleistocene – Recent Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior
Eurasian wolf (Canis lupus lupus). Conservation status Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1] Scientific classification Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior
Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Clade: Synapsida Class: Mammalia Order: Carnivora Suborder: Caniformia Family: Canidae Genus: Canis Species: C. lupus Binomial name Canis lupus
Linnaeus, 1758[2] Subspecies

Numerous and disputed, see Subspecies of Canis lupus

What You Need To Know About The Mexican Gray Wolf

Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior

Find out how Canis lupus baileyi became one of the most endangered mammals in North America—and how it can be saved from extinction.

The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program

Mexican gray wolves (also called just Mexican wolves or "lobos" ) are mammals. The Mexican wolf is the smallest of the five kinds (subspecies) of gray wolf in North America. They are also the most endangered - there are only about 350 Mexican wolves in the world today. Adult lobos usually weigh 60 to 80 pounds and are about 4 to 5 feet long, about the size of a German shepherd. They usually have coats that are a mixture of gray, brown, rust and tan over light-colored underparts. The tail, ears, and legs often are highlighted in black.

Mexican Gray Wolf [Canis lupus baileyi]

Mexican Gray Wolf Behavior
Smallest of the Gray Wolf subspecies, Mexican Gray Wolves are 54 to 66 inches in length from snout to tail, and their weight is 50 to 90 pounds (22 to 40 kg). Their coat is a varied mixture of tan, red, white, and black fur. They are generally light in color on their lower muzzle, chest, and underbelly, while their head, shoulders and back are darker in color.

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