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Levels of Paraplegia

[Summary]Paraplegia Paraplegia and Functionality The degree of function that a person with paraplegia will experience depends upon the level of injury, type of injury, and whether the injury was complete or incomplete, or partial paralysis. What are The Compl

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Paraplegia

Paraplegia and Functionality

The degree of function that a person with paraplegia will experience depends upon the level of injury, type of injury, and whether the injury was complete or incomplete, or partial paralysis.

What are The Complications of Paraplegia?

Complications of paraplegia include:

Skin care issues

MR Imaging Findings in Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

Our patients satisfied the clinical criteria for diagnosis of HSP as proposed by Harding in 1984.11 Most had an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, according to the criteria proposed by Coutinho et al.12 Seven of 9 patients belonged clinically to the class of complicated HSP because they had, in addition to spastic paraplegia, other findings, including dementia, peripheral neuropathy, cerebellar signs, ophthalmologic findings, and distal amyotrophy. Neuropathologic studies looking at the brain and spinal cord of patients with HSP revealed neurodegeneration and gliosis affecting a large portion of the central nervous system: the corticospinal tracts, thalamus, cerebral white matter, substantia nigra, cerebellum, anterior and lateral corticospinal tracts, spinocerebellar tracts, and posterior columns, mainly the fasciculus gracilis of the spinal cord. HSP is a retrograde axonal degeneration or a “dying back” process, starting at the distal portion of the corticospinal tracts, the fasciculus gracilis, and the spinocerebellar tracts and progressing cranially toward the cell body. The rest of the neurons showed an excessive amount of lipofuscin and eosinophilic intracytoplasmic granules, reflecting accelerated brain aging.9,13–15

NCBI

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C7 Complete & Below (including Paraplegia Of All Levels)

Key muscles:

Triceps: (straighten your elbow)

Intercostals / rib muscles: (help with breathing and with steadying the trunk) – In injuries between T1 and T12, the lower the level of the injury, the more rib muscles are working. In injuries below T12 all these muscles are working.

Abdominal muscles (help with coughing, steadying the trunk and moving it forwards) – In injuries above T8 there is usually no abdominal muscles function. Below T8, there is wide variation in the amount of abdominal muscle function at each level of injury.

Ataxia-telangiectasia

Ataxia-telangiectasia

Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT or A-T), also referred to as ataxia-telangiectasia syndrome or Louis–Bar syndrome,[1] is a rare, neurodegenerative, autosomal recessive disease causing severe disability. Ataxia refers to poor coordination and telangiectasia to small dilated blood vessels, both of which are hallmarks of the disease.[2]

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