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Hasidic Jews Rituals

[Summary]Judaism 101: Kosher Sex Level: Intermediate Note: This page addresses issues of Jewish law that may not be appropriate for younger readers. In places, it discusses sexual behavior in plain and frank terms. Please exercise appropriate discretion. Jewi

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Judaism 101: Kosher Sex

Level: Intermediate

Note: This page addresses issues of Jewish law that may not be appropriate for younger readers. In places, it discusses sexual behavior in plain and frank terms. Please exercise appropriate discretion.

Jewish Attitudes Towards Sexuality

In Jewish law, sex is not considered shameful, sinful or obscene. Sex is not thought of as a necessary evil for the sole purpose of procreation. Although sexual desire comes from the yetzer ra (the evil impulse), it is no more evil than hunger or thirst, which also come from the yetzer ra. Like hunger, thirst or other basic instincts, sexual desire must be controlled and channeled, satisfied at the proper time, place and manner. But when sexual desire is satisfied between a husband and wife at the proper time, out of mutual love and desire, sex is a mitzvah.

A Life Apart: Hasidism In America -- Inside the Community: A Holy Life

INSIDE THE COMMUNITY: A HOLY LIFE

An outsider visiting a Hasidic neighborhood in Brooklyn is likely to be struck immediately by just how Hasidic it looks. The Hasidic parts of Crown Heights, Williamsburg, and Boro Park are lively islands of traditional Jewishness in the midst of larger, racially diverse, working and middle class neighborhoods. The stores have signs in Yiddish and Hebrew; the men wear long beards and long black garb, while the women wear wigs or scarves and modest, if often quite fashionable, clothing; the fast food restaurants serve kosher food; special Hasidic school buses carry loads of noisy children, and other special buses carry Hasidic men into Manhattan to work. One seems to be in a separate world within the city. Lis Harris, in her book Holy Days, describes it as otherworldly:

Insight into the rituals performed by orthodox Jews | Daily Mail Online

A photojournalist who grew up in an ultra orthodox Jewish home in Israel has revealed the intriguing rituals, ceremonies and customs performed by his community in a series of images.

Yaakov Naumi’s fascinating photographs include a man lying in a grave to prolong life, a chicken being walked on a piece of string and men tying a rope to a bride and dancing around her.

Hasidism

Hasidic Judaism arose in 12th-century Germany as a movement emphasizing asceticism and mystical experience born out of love and humility before God. Hasidic Judaism is different from other branches (or denominations) of Judaism today such as Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and Reform Judaism.

Ask the Rabbi, JewishAnswers.org » Hasidic Life Today

Question: I have recently been assigned to complete a project on Hasidic Judaism. I have several questions on the subject I would like to ask; the main queries being (1) what are the rules of membership, (2) what is the interaction within itself and with the general population including how membership is controlled, (3) the status (religious connection and place in the mainline religions) of the group if applicable or the reason the group was created (can be in history), (4) what is the daily life of the group and what are the gender specific roles in the family, (5) what are the special/unique practices, customs, and/or rituals, (6) how does Hasidism perpetuate?, (7) how does the future of the group look and are there any special political issues?, (8) do the Hasidic Jews differ greatly from the surrounding community?, (9) how are the leadership positions filled and how do they govern? Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

Hasidim facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Hasidim

ETHNONYM: Chassidim

Orientation

Identification. Hasidim are ultrareligious Jews who live within the framework of their centuries-old beliefs and traditions and who observe Orthodox law so meticulously that they are set apart from most other Orthodox Jews. Even their appearance is distinctive: the men bearded in black suits or long black coats, and women in high-necked, loose-fitting dresses, with kerchiefs or traditional wigs covering their hair. They are dedicated to living uncontaminated by contact with modern society except in accord with the demands of the workplace and the state. They do not, for the most part, own radio or television sets, nor do they frequent cinemas or theaters. They dress and pray as their forefathers did in the eighteenth century, and they reject Western secular society, which they regard as degenerate. They do not, however, constitute a uniform group but are divided into a number of distinctive sects and communities, each organized around the teachings of a particular rebbe, or charismatic religious leader. Although the various Hasidic sects share a desire to maintain the integrity of Orthodox Judaism, they are sometimes sharply divided on practice, points of philosophy, and the personality of their religious leaders. In spite of their differences, all attach great importance to preventing assimilation by insulating their members from the secular influences of the host culture, which they perceive to be disruptive of the lifestyle they wish to observe. To outsiders, the Hasidim are a homogeneous entity whose life-style and religious practices mirror those of previous generations. Such a view exaggerates the reality. Despite the perception of Hasidic society as relatively static, and as unresponsive to social, political, economic, and technological changes over the past decades, a more precise appraisal is that it is an ongoing sociocultural entity constantly adapting to events in the larger society and is, in the process, becoming transformed. Owing to their persistent and organized efforts, the Hasidim have both maintained their distinctive way of life and adapted to societal influences that in the case of other ethnic and religious minorities have resulted in their assimilation.

Ask the Rabbi, JewishAnswers.org » Hasidic Life Today

Question: I have recently been assigned to complete a project on Hasidic Judaism. I have several questions on the subject I would like to ask; the main queries being (1) what are the rules of membership, (2) what is the interaction within itself and with the general population including how membership is controlled, (3) the status (religious connection and place in the mainline religions) of the group if applicable or the reason the group was created (can be in history), (4) what is the daily life of the group and what are the gender specific roles in the family, (5) what are the special/unique practices, customs, and/or rituals, (6) how does Hasidism perpetuate?, (7) how does the future of the group look and are there any special political issues?, (8) do the Hasidic Jews differ greatly from the surrounding community?, (9) how are the leadership positions filled and how do they govern? Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

Orthodox Judaism

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