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Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian Principles

[Summary]Jeffersonian democracy Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale in 1800. Jeffersonian democracy (sometimes capitalized), named after its advocate Thomas Jefferson, was one of two dominant political outlooks and movements in the United States f

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Jeffersonian democracy

Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale in 1800.

Jeffersonian democracy (sometimes capitalized), named after its advocate Thomas Jefferson, was one of two dominant political outlooks and movements in the United States from the 1790s to the 1820s. The term was commonly used to refer to the Democratic-Republican Party, which Jefferson founded in opposition to the Federalist Party of Alexander Hamilton. The Jeffersonians were deeply committed to Republicanism in the United States, which meant opposition to aristocracy of any form, opposition to corruption, insistence on virtue, with a priority for the "yeoman farmer", "planters", and the "plain folk". They were antagonistic to the aristocratic elitism of merchants, bankers and manufacturers, distrusted factory workers, and were on the watch for supporters of the dreaded British system of government. Jeffersonian democracy persisted as an element of the Democratic Party into the early 20th century, as exemplified by William Jennings Bryan (1860–1925), and its themes continue to echo in the 21st century.[1][2]

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Hamilton vs. Jefferson

Hamilton vs. Jefferson

A conflict took shape in the 1790s between America's first political parties. Indeed, the Federalists, led by Alexander Hamilton, and the Republicans (also called Democratic-Republicans), led by Thomas Jefferson, were the first political parties in the Western world. Unlike loose political groupings in the British House of Commons or in the American colonies before the Revolution, both had reasonably consistent and principled platforms, relatively stable popular followings, and continuing organizations.

Hamilton vs. Jefferson

Hamilton vs. Jefferson

The conflict that took shape in the 1790s between the Federalists and the Antifederalists exercised a profound impact on American history. The Federalists, led by Alexander Hamilton, who had married into the wealthy Schuyler family, represented the urban mercantile interests of the seaports; the Antifederalists, led by Thomas Jefferson, spoke for the rural and southern interests. The debate between the two concerned the power of the central government versus that of the states, with the Federalists favoring the former and the Antifederalists advocating states' rights.

Hamilton Vs. Jefferson | .

I had intended to post Part II of the WWI question last night, but got caught up doing movie reviews on Life of Ando. So to slake your ravenous historical thirst in the meantime, here is my assignment from my history class this past week. If you’re really into American history and how the politics of the early Republic shook out, Jefferson vs. Hamilton is a great study. It’s also a little, I guess comforting, to know that as bad as we think today’s politicians are, politics was always a very dirty game. Like Bismarck said, “Laws are like sausages. Better to not see them being made.” And as Ecclesiastes says, “There’s nothing new under the sun.”

A Matter of Principle: Alexander Hamilton's Economics Created Our Constitution

A MATTER OF PRINCIPLE

Alexander Hamilton's Economics
Created Our Constitution

by Nancy Spannaus

[PDF version of this article]

Dec. 6—Contrary to the views of nearly all economic experts, there is a simple reality which thinking Americans must face in the midst of this unprecedented breakdown of the financial and physical economy: First, that the key to reversing this global crisis, which threatens civilization itself, can be found in the principle behind the economic measures of America's first Treasury Secretary, Alexander Hamilton. Second, that that principle is firmly embedded in the U.S. Constitution itself.

Claiming Thomas Jefferson: The Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian Genesis of American Progressivism

Claiming Thomas Jefferson:

The Jeffersonian and Hamiltonian Genesis of American Progressivism

Paul Joseph Krause

Baldwin Wallace University

“Thomas Jefferson, author of America.” These are the titular words that Christopher Hitchens used to describe America’s third President and author of the Declaration of Independence.[1] Indeed, Thomas Jefferson invokes much emotion, praise, and criticism from devotees, biographers, historians, political theorists, and everyday Americans. As the author of the famous words “all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,” Thomas Jefferson continues to serve as a model of inspiration for the defense of liberty and the promise to create a more perfect union.

Catalog Record: Hamiltonian principles; extracts from the... | Hathi Trust Digital Library

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Jeffersonian principles and Hamiltonian principles; extracts from the writings of Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton. (Book, 1932) [WorldCat.org]

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