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Arguments for Ratifying the Constitution

[Summary]Congress for Kids: [Constitution]: Ratifying the Constitution Review a little about the men involved in the ratification of the Constitution. Choose which of them you wish to become. Begin your research by using Web sites specifically designated for

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Congress for Kids: [Constitution]: Ratifying the Constitution

Review a little about the men involved in the ratification of the Constitution. Choose which of them you wish to become.

Begin your research by using Web sites specifically designated for your man, but be sure to also review the general information sites as well.

As you research, use the following questions to guide you through the information: Why would he be considered a federalist or an anti-federalist? What in his background would lead you to believe he would take the stand he did? What were his main arguments? (Choose one or two you can argue best for the debate.) How did he rebut his opponent's arguments? Did he concede any arguments to his opponents? What made his speeches so persuasive? Technique or content or something else? What was he like as a speaker? (e.g., bold & strong, or quiet & soft spoken)?

The Debate for the United States Constitution

The Great Debate

The transition from the Articles of Confederation to the United States Constitution wasn't a seamless one, and fixing the problems of the Articles of Confederation required a series of lengthy debates both during and after the convention. But one thing was certain, something had to be changed. Fifty-five Delegates met at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 to determine how best to adjust the existing document.

Who Won

Arguments for Ratifying the Constitution
Ratifying the Constitution

Once the Constitution of the United States was written in 1787 at the Philadelphia convention, the next step was ratification. This is the formal process, outlined in Article VII, which required that nine of the thirteen states had to agree to adopt the Constitution before it could go into effect.

Ratifying the Constitution | EDSITEment

After four months of debate and compromise in Philadelphia, the Constitutional Convention came to a close on September 17, 1787. The delegates’ work was not yet over. Now supporters of the new Constitution returned to their respective home states faced with the task of convincing the public, and their representatives, to adopt the Constitution. If they failed, all of the argument and negotiation of the convention would be for nothing.

What were some arguments against ratifying Constitution and the Bill of Rights?

Arguments for Ratifying the Constitution

For the ratification I most importantly need to know some reasons or arguments that were brought up against it? Who are some of the people that fought against it and how did they fight? On the Bill of Rights I need to know just why did some oppose and how important was a Bill of Right for ratification? Thanks!

What were the arguments for and against the ratification of the Constitution?

Arguments for Ratifying the Constitution

Describe the different positions. Are these positions still evident in American politics today? Give examples.

Am Rev Essays--Bernstein

THE ARGUMENT OVER THE CONSTITUTION

R. B. Bernstein,
Daniel M. Lyons Visiting Professor in American History, Brooklyn College/CUNY (1997-1998)
and Adjunct Professor, New York Law School

In some ways, the years 1787-1789, during which the American people debated and ultimately adopted the Constitution, compose the supreme moment of American political and constitutional creativity. Nothing else comes close.

henry

In such numerous bodies, there must necessarily be some designing, bad men. To suppose that so large a number as three fourths of the states will concur, is to suppose that they will possess genius, intelligence, and integrity, approaching to miraculous. It would indeed be miraculous that they should concur in the same amendments, or even in such as would bear some likeness to one another; for four of the smallest states, that do not collectively contain one tenth part of the population of the United States, may obstruct the most salutary and necessary amendments. Nay, in these four states, six tenths of the people may reject these amendments; and suppose that amendments shall be opposed to amendments, which is highly probable,�is it possible that three fourths can ever agree to the same amendments? A bare majority in these four small states may hinder the adoption of amendments; so that we may fairly and justly conclude that one twentieth part of the American people may prevent the removal of the most grievous inconveniences and oppression, by refusing to accede to amendments.

Ratification of the Constitution | Teaching American History

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TeachingAmericanHistory.org

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Ratifying the Constitution Assignment

Ratifying the Constitution Assignment
Pages 234-237
Complete the assignment on your own paper.
You may use the textbook or the Internet sites to complete this assignment.

Terms & Names - Explain the significance of and define the following in relation to ratifying the Constitution

1. federalism
2. Antifederalists
3. Federalists
4. The Federalist papers
5. George Mason
6. James Madison
7. Bill of Rights - Why was it added to the Constitution?
8. Use a diagram like the one below to compare and contrast the Federalists and the Antifederalists. You may use the charts below to create your diagram.

Arguments Against Ratification of the Constitution at the Virginia Convention (1788)

When the delegates to the Virginia convention debated the Constitution in June 1788, they did so under the assumption that an aye vote there would provide the vital, deciding ninth affirmative needed for ratification. As it turned out, New Hampshire provided that necessary vote; but acting without that knowledge and aware that other states deemed Virginia's acceptance critical to the success of a new government, these delegates were especially primed to do battle. Adding to the dynamism of this particular convention was the caliber of the participants: there were exceptional men among both the proponents of and opponents to the Constitution. Among its champions were Edmund Pendleton, James Madison, George Nicholas, and John Marshall. Opposing them was a formidable team that included, to name just a few, George Mason, Richard Henry Lee, James Monroe, and its leader Patrick Henry. Henry had served as a wartime governor of the state but had made his reputation through his inflammatory rhetoric as a young revolutionary. In the following selection he once again uses his oratory talents as well as legal skills to try to guide public affairs as he presents impassioned, imaginative, and negative arguments.

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