Recommend:

Index > > 4 Causes of Aristotle

4 Causes of Aristotle

[Summary]Four causes The "four causes" are elements of an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby explanations of change or movement are classified into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?". Aristotle wrote that

Advertisement

Four causes

The "four causes" are elements of an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby explanations of change or movement are classified into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?". Aristotle wrote that "we do not have knowledge of a thing until we have grasped its why, that is to say, its cause."[1][2] While there are cases where identifying a "cause" is difficult, or in which "causes" might merge, Aristotle was convinced that his four "causes" provided an analytical scheme of general applicability.[3]

Aristotle: Logic

Applying the principles developed in his logical treatises, Aristotle offered a general account of the operation of individual substances in the natural world. He drew a significant distinction between things of two sorts: those that move only when moved by something else and those that are capable of moving themselves. In separate treatises, Aristotle not only proposed a proper description of things of each sort but also attempted to explain why they function as they do.

Aristotle's Four Causes

Definition, exercise, and reflections on importance of Aristotle's 4 Causes.

Aristotle

Aristotle (Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs) (384 B.C.E. – March 7, 322 B.C.E.) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato, and teacher of Alexander the Great. He wrote on diverse subjects, including physics, metaphysics, poetry (including theater), logic, rhetoric, politics, government, ethics, biology, and zoology. Along with Socrates and Plato, he was among the most influential of the ancient Greek philosophers, as they transformed Presocratic Greek philosophy into the foundations of Western philosophy as it is known today. Most researchers credit Plato and Aristotle with founding two of the most important schools of ancient philosophy, along with Stoicism and Epicureanism.

Aristotle's Causes & Prime Mover

This video explains Aristotle's four causes and the relationship they have with the universe and its origin, cause, creator: the Prime Mover.

Aristotle > By Individual Philosopher > Philosophy

Aristotle (384 - 322 B.C.) was an important Greek philosopher from the Socratic (or Classical) period, mainly based in Athens. He is one of the most important founding figures in Western Philosophy, and the first to create a comprehensive system of philosophy, encompassing Ethics, Aesthetics, Politics, Metaphysics, Logic and science.

Enjoying "Oedipus the King" by Sophocles

Enjoying "Oedipus the King", by Sophocles
Ed Friedlander MD
[email protected]

This website collects no information. If you e-mail me, neither your e-mail address nor any other information will ever be passed on to any third party, unless required by law. I have no sponsors and do not host paid advertisements. All external links are provided freely to sites that I believe my visitors will find helpful. This page was last modified December 7, 2011.

[Editor: Admin]
Related for 4 Causes of Aristotle
  • Aristotle and the 4 CausesJanuary 8

    Aristotle's Four Causes and How it Applies to Your Body and Soul Plato and Aristotle Plato says "Hey, forms are up there." Aristotle says, "Hey, forms are down in here." Unlike Plato and the early Platonists who posited two causes (Gre

  • Aristotle's Final CauseJanuary 8

    Aristotle on Causality (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 1. Introduction Aristotle was not the first person to engage in a causal investigation of the world around us. From the very beginning, and independently of Aristotle, the investigation of

  • Aristotle's Four CausesJanuary 8

    Aristotle's Four Causes Definition, exercise, and reflections on importance of Aristotle's 4 Causes. Aristotle on Causality (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 1. Introduction Aristotle was not the first person to engage in a causal investigation o

  • Formal Cause AristotleApril 8

    Aristotle on Causality (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 1. Introduction Aristotle was not the first person to engage in a causal investigation of the world around us. From the very beginning, and independently of Aristotle, the investigation of

  • Aristotle 4 Causes ExplainedApril 8

    Aristotle Peripatetic school Aristotelianism Metaphysics Golden mean Aristotelian logic Hylomorphism Theory of the soul Aristotle (/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[1]Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης, pronounced [aristotélɛːs], Aristotélēs; 384–322 BC)[2] was an ancient Greek philos

  • Aristotle's Efficient CauseApril 8

    Aristotle on Causality (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 1. Introduction Aristotle was not the first person to engage in a causal investigation of the world around us. From the very beginning, and independently of Aristotle, the investigation of

  • Examples of Aristotle's Four CausesApril 8

    Four causes The "four causes" are elements of an influential principle in Aristotelian thought whereby explanations of change or movement are classified into four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?". Aristotle wrote that

  • Aristotle's Four Causes ExplanationApril 8

    Lecture on 4 causes The Four Causes What are there four of? Aristotle's doctrine of the four causes is crucial, but easily misunderstood. It is natural for us (post-Humeans) to think of (what Aristotle calls) "causes" in terms of our latter-day

  • Aristotle's Formal CauseApril 8

    Lecture on 4 causes The Four Causes What are there four of? Aristotle's doctrine of the four causes is crucial, but easily misunderstood. It is natural for us (post-Humeans) to think of (what Aristotle calls) "causes" in terms of our latter-day

Copyright Asdnyi All rights reserved.